Coq Au Vin – Recipe

Cut up a chicken into a “ten piece bucket” add a little wine (okay, a lot of wine) and a few other things. It’s a romantic one-pot dish anyone can make at home. This is a variation on the classic dish from Food Nation Radio Network.

 

 

 

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The Super-Secret BBQ Sauce – Recipe

(Photo/Elizabeth Dougherty)

This is really a dipping sauce. It has no corn syrup in it and not a lot of sugar, so it’s not as thick as your usual sauce, although it will thicken a bit as it cools.  We thought it was good when we developed the recipe, but when my son started asking for it, I knew it was a keeper. Here’s the Food Nation Radio Network recipe:

Ingredients (organic, if possible)

3 cups apple juice

1 TB lemon juice

½ cup ketchup with NO corn syrup in it

1/8 cup Dijon

¼ cup brown sugar

1/8 tsp clove, cinnamon, ginger, red pepper

½ tsp cumin

¼ tsp white pepper

1 tsp garlic powder

1 tsp sweet paprika

½ tsp chili powder

Method

Combine the above ingredients and reduce by half. That’s it! Enjoy!

Elizabeth Dougherty has been a food writer for over 10 years, attended culinary school and holds a Bachelor’s degree, Magna Cum Laude in Hospitality, Business and Labor Relations from NYIT. She has been a talk show host of nearly 200 episodes of Food Nation Radio which airs each Saturday morning at 8 on the Business Talk Radio Network (beginning June 1st 2013), Saturday afternoons at 4 on flagship WWBA AM820 News, and Sunday mornings at 8 on both  WAMT AM1190 News and WIXC AM1060 News. You can read her articles and hear previous shows on her podcast page on the Food Nation Radio Network website and on Facebook.


Audio – Food Democracy Now’s Update On GMO Labeling, Wheat And More

This week on Food Nation Radio Network, we spoke with Dave Murphy from Food Democracy Now about state GMO labeling efforts, America’s wheat farmers and the King Amendment to the Farm Bill.

Here’s what he had to say: 

About Dave Murphy: Dave Murphy is the founder and executive director of Food Democracy Now!, a grassroots movement of more than 650,000 American farmers and citizens dedicated to reforming policies relating to food, agriculture and the environment. Murphy has been called “the most crucial and politically savvy actor in the on-going efforts to help move American agriculture into the 21st century” as a result of his “Sustainable Dozen” campaign, which resulted in four candidates being placed in high level positions at the USDA and his efforts to reform food and agriculture under the Obama administration.

Elizabeth Dougherty has been a food writer for over 10 years, attended culinary school and holds a Bachelor’s degree, Magna Cum Laude in Hospitality, Business and Labor Relations from NYIT. She has been a talk show host of nearly 200 episodes of Food Nation Radio which airs each Saturday morning at 8 on the Business Talk Radio Network (beginning June 1st 2013), Saturday afternoons at 4 on flagship WWBA AM820 News, and Sunday mornings at 8 on both  WAMT AM1190 News and WIXC AM1060 News. You can read her articles and hear previous shows on her podcast page on the Food Nation Radio Network website and on Facebook.

Apparently Seekers Of Healthy Food Are Orthorexic – Audio

Food Nation Radio Network has determined that a new disinformation campaign is in the works. Although the term was first coined in 1997, the term orthorexia nervosa is now being applied to non-GMO activists and parents concerned about feeding their families healthy foods.

Here’s what we had to say about it on the show: 

Elizabeth Dougherty has been a food writer for over 10 years, attended culinary school and holds a Bachelor’s degree, Magna Cum Laude in Hospitality, Business and Labor Relations from NYIT. She has been a talk show host of nearly 200 episodes of Food Nation Radio which airs each Saturday morning at 8 on the Business Talk Radio Network (beginning June 1st 2013), Saturday afternoons at 4 on flagship WWBA AM820 News, and Sunday mornings at 8 on both  WAMT AM1190 News and WIXC AM1060 News. You can read her articles and hear previous shows on her podcast page on the Food Nation Radio Network website and on Facebook.

Cioppino – Keeping it Simple – Recipe

I used to make this dish long before I knew it was called “Cioppino”. It was a family recipe that has evolved over the years. If you are looking for a simple way to eat some delicious seafood, this is the way to go.

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Chicken Methi Malai Is Savory And Delicious – Recipe

Salty, savory, spicy, sweet. All these flavors are covered in this dish developed by Food Nation Radio Network. You CAN make curry at home that’s not from a jar and the results are outstanding. We took all the guesswork out of it. Follow these simple instructions and let us know what you think.

(Photo/Elizabeth Dougherty)

Ingredients

(All organic, if possible)
1 chicken, giblets removed
1 large, sweet onion, roughly chopped
1/2 cup nonfat yogurt
1/2 tsp turmeric
1 1/2 tsp red chili powder
1 1/2 tsp sea salt, plus 1/2 tsp
1 TB good quality sherry vinegar
1 whole cinnamon stick
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
2 star anise
1/8 tsp clove
1/8 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 bay leaves
1/4 tsp red chili flakes
1 tsp ginger paste
1 whole clove of garlic
3 TB fenugreek seeds
1/4 cup grape tomatoes
2 TB ketchup
1 tsp green curry paste
3/4 tsp garam masala
2 dried red chilis
2 cups chicken stock
1 TB cane sugar
basmati rice

Method

Place roughly chopped onion in the bottom of a slow cooker. All all the other spices and ingredients, except for the extra 1/2 tsp of sea salt, the TB of sugar and the chicken stock. Add the chicken, breast side down then flip over, so it’s coated with the spices. Carefully pour in the chicken stock. Set cooker on low for 6-8 hours or more. Allow to cool slightly and place the entire mixture (most slow cookers have a removable ceramic pot) in the fridge overnight, if possible. You can skip the overnight step, but it makes it easier to shred the chicken when it’s cold. When you take it out of the fridge, place the chicken on a plate for shredding, making sure there are no bones left in the the pot (because the chicken will fall apart, it’s so tender). Place the mixture that is left in the pot in a food processor and buzz for about a minute. Strain it back into a wide pot or deep pan. Shred the chicken and put the chicken pieces in the pot with the mixture. Heat to a boil, then reduce to a simmer while you make some basmati rice (according to package directions). Add the remaining 1/2 tsp sea salt and 1 TB of cane sugar to the chicken mixture while it is reheating, stirring to combine. Serve over hot rice. Enjoy!

Elizabeth Dougherty has been a food writer for over 10 years, attended culinary school and holds a Bachelor’s degree, Magna Cum Laude in Hospitality, Business and Labor Relations from NYIT. She has been a talk show host of nearly 200 episodes of Food Nation Radio which airs each Saturday morning at 8 on the Business Talk Radio Network (beginning June 1st 2013), Saturday afternoons at 4 on flagship WWBA AM820 News, and Sunday mornings at 8 on both  WAMT AM1190 News and WIXC AM1060 News. You can read her articles and hear previous shows on her podcast page on the Food Nation Radio Network website and on Facebook.

Canola Oil’s Connection To Heart Lesions – Audio

This is important information for people who still believe Canola is one of the healthiest oils around. Food Nation Radio Network spoke with Dr. Kaayla Daniel about Canola and some better alternatives.

Here’s what she had to say:

About Dr. Daniel (from her website):  Dr. Daniel earned her PhD in Nutritional Sciences and Anti-Aging Therapies from the Union Institute and University in Cincinnati, and is certified as a clinical nutritionist (CCN)  by the Clinical Nutrition Certification Board of the International and American Association of Clinical Nutritionists in Dallas.

Dr. Daniel  is Vice President of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a member of the  board of directors of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund, and received the Weston A. Price Foundation’s Integrity in Science Award in 2005.

Elizabeth Dougherty has been a food writer for over 10 years, attended culinary school and holds a Bachelor’s degree, Magna Cum Laude in Hospitality, Business and Labor Relations from NYIT. She has been a talk show host of nearly 200 episodes of Food Nation Radio which airs each Saturday morning at 8 on the Business Talk Radio Network (beginning June 1st 2013), Saturday afternoons at 4 on flagship WWBA AM820 News, and Sunday mornings at 8 on both  WAMT AM1190 News and WIXC AM1060 News. You can read her articles and hear previous shows on her podcast page on the Food Nation Radio Network website and on Facebook.

Old Florida Expands Farmed Oyster Industry

Elizabeth Dougherty, Food Nation Radio Network

Oyster lovers know what it’s like. A platter of ice-cold bivalves is placed in front of you with a tangy mignonette, some horseradish and cocktail sauce. Your mouth starts to water.

I’ve felt that moment of anticipation nearly one hundred times in my life. My first oyster was at a place called Calico Jack’s in Central Florida. I ate it on a dare. I wasn’t prepared for the chilled, salty, oceanic taste. The soft texture made it seem so rich and decadent, while the sheer rawness of it made me feel just a little naughty and adventurous.

The next time I had a truly knee-knocking oyster was at Julia Child’s 90th birthday party. In the Northwest, farmers had begun raising Kumamoto oysters from Japanese seed stock. They are truly beautiful, delicate oysters with a sweet flavor that are rather small in size, but worth the effort.

In the years since, I’ve placated my oyster cravings with those flown in from high up in the Northeast near Connecticut and Maine and Prince Edward Island.

You may be shocked to find out Florida is now farming its own oysters as a much bigger industry venture. When I heard this, I was rather skeptical, maybe even a little afraid. Is there enough fresh water input for them to grow? Is the temperature cold enough?

Alligator Harbor’s chilly freshwater springs combine with the salty waters off the Gulf to make a perfect habitat for raising Florida oysters. Made from the stock of coastal oysters, they seem to thrive in the local waters.

(Photo/Elizabeth Dougherty)

Wondering what they taste like? We were too, so we stopped by Spring Creek Restaurant owned by Leo Lovel. The same gentleman who came up with the idea of farming oysters in his backyard.

(Photo/Elizabeth Dougherty)

Lovel purchased the restaurant in 1977 and it doesn’t look like he changed a thing. I don’t think the previous owners changed much either. It’s your typical Old Florida fish shack, right next to the coast and about 30 miles outside of Tallahassee.

(Photo/Elizabeth Dougherty)

After they brought out the oysters on ice with lemon wedges, horseradish and the like, I felt I’d be pretty rude to ask about getting a mignonette. I drizzled the beauties with a little lemon juice and dug right in to my first Florida oyster. What a shock! They are very briny, but not overly so, and the lemon juice combined with the brine to perfection. Adding anything else would have ruined the flavor party in my mouth. The oysters were creamy and fresh and easily rivaled any of my favorites like Blue Point and Kumamoto.

(Photo/Elizabeth Dougherty)

As an aside, I also tried one of their crab cakes. With the rustic décor, I wasn’t expecting much. The adage applied, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” The crab cake was full of moist chunks of crab and incredibly filling. It was better than any I’ve had in a Florida restaurant.

In fact, everything at this unassuming place was made with care, from the homemade ranch dressing, to the ridiculously outstanding, tangy-sweet key lime pie with real whipped cream.

(Photo/Elizabeth Dougherty)

Everything was so good, I was a little upset I couldn’t make another 30 mile trip to go back the next day. I’ll just have to be content with my afternoon love encounter with the Florida oyster. For now.

I miss you, already.

Correction: Oysters have been raised in certain parts of Florida, but this is an expansion of that industry.

Elizabeth Dougherty has been a food writer for over 10 years, attended culinary school and holds a Bachelor’s degree, Magna Cum Laude in Hospitality, Business and Labor Relations from NYIT. She has been a talk show host of nearly 200 episodes of Food Nation Radio which airs each Saturday morning at 8 on the Business Talk Radio Network (beginning June 1st 2013), Saturday afternoons at 4 on flagship WWBA AM820 News, and Sunday mornings at 8 on both  WAMT AM1190 News and WIXC AM1060 News. You can read her articles and hear previous shows on her podcast page on the Food Nation Radio Network website and on Facebook.

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